Where’s my Malmal cotton saree?

Come summer or hot climatic conditions and most Indian women who wear a saree, take to cottons like a duck takes to water. It is one of the easiest and best ways to beat the heat. For the ones who are more attuned to wearing the salwar kameez, it is the cotton version of the same no doubt. Lighter the colors better the cooling since dark colors absorb heat faster compared to the light ones.

What’s new this summer?

There is a beautiful range of pure handloom Malmal cottons that mostly includes light and pastel colors in vibrant shades that are pleasing to the eye and are light on the body. Going by the virtue of Malmal fabric, it is a weave that evokes images of smooth and soft sarees that one can easily wear throughout the day and bask in admiring gaze while enjoying its lovely feel.

Beautiful Jaipuri hand block printed sarees with lightly distributed vj13Handloom.jp+12-VJ-MALKHA_1.jpgmotifs and floral scapes, exquisitely matched floral borders and nice geometrical, flowery, designs, sometimes with large motifs of birds on the pallu or end piece in self color, make it a feast for the eyes – fresh-feel and captivating. It’s like the soft summer breeze gently cruising along the dunes of the Rajasthan desert.

In addition you have the blouse attachment that could be a matched Malmal cotton piece or a pure handcrafted one.

Unnati Silks offers these knowing the pulse of the market, the need for unique and eye-catching fabrics every now and then.

What makes cotton so popular?

100000248117_2Handlooms are the soul of Indian fabrics and cotton handlooms are very good showpieces of different designs and patterns from the varied styles of Indian ethnic fabrics like the saree and salwar kameez.

Handloom Cottons are good plain weaves of simple lattice of closely placed yarn threads.  A widely preferred natural fibre material , cotton is soft, smooth textured, light, airy, sheer, skin-friendly and very comfortable as a fabric for daily wear and long durations.

As a natural fibre that is absorbent, smooth and closely woven, cotton fabric serves as a very good canvas for exotic art like the Kalamkari or pen Batik, the tie & dye Bandhani, the unique ikat of Pochampally, Sambalpur or Rajkot, the Patachitra  etc.

Bengal Tants in their soft and light colors, the comfortable Jamdani cottons with their hand woven motifs and zari motifs, the transparent muslin Dhaka cotton, the splendid smooth feel Sambalpuri ikats with their unique pallu magic, the Bomkais with enchanting motifs are all wonderful creations in cotton that serve the need of the occasion.

Besides,

  • The physical qualities of cotton as good fabric material of comfort and feel, absorbent during hot and insulating in cold weather conditions, are welcome features.
  • In addition with mercerization, cotton also acquires additional strength and lustre.
  • It provides good affinity to most colour dyes, blends very well with almost all other fabrics, sets a very good backdrop for block prints and all other nature of prints.
  • Its absorbency of colour dyes is very high that ensures fastness and vibrancy in fabrics.
  • It is the right canvas for adorning additions like zardozi, mirror work, kundan work, beads, sequins and a whole lot of other adornments.

Summer and cotton go hand in hand. While the season gives the need to wear the fabric, the fabric serves the occasion to flaunt freshness even while beating the heat.

 

Post author

Meet the Gyani Mahastree, that she is fondly called. A penchant for spotting the saree variety from just a glance at it, she spreads the gyan on the weave and the fabric like she has woven it. A fascination for anything colourful led her to get interested in Indian ethnic quite early. Moreover the like of the saree, and her interest and knowledge in traditional handlooms does much for our customer's curiosity as much as solving our friendly disputes. When she is not hitting the road to a traditional weaving destination in some corner of India or poring over a book on the Indian ethos and fabrics, she makes her own notes that she would like to offer as a discourse to the less initiated. No wonder she weaves nice yarns on yarns for our benefit and the world at large. One of her retirement plans is to write a book on all the wool that she is gathering, though surprisingly she is nowhere close to that age. If you wish to get more on Indian traditional varieties, you can knock her door at parineeti@unnatisilk.com